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Stefan Lesicnik (stefanlsd)

June 15th, 2009 No comments

Age: 28
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
IRC Nick: stefanlsd

second from the right

second from the right

Desktop

Desktop

How long have you used Linux and what was your first distro?
I’ve been involved with Linux since around 1996. After leaving school and doing an MCSE (sorry!), I knew I only wanted to work with Linux. My first distribution was Redhat 3.0.3 (Picasso).

How long have you been using Ubuntu?
After using Gentoo for many years, i finally moved to Ubuntu Feisty and haven’t looked back since!

When did you get involved with the MOTU team and how?
I started to contribute during the Intrepid cycle. I am not a great programmer (although really enjoy it), so I mainly started with small fixes. Adding a watch file, incorporating a patch, looking at various bugs and trying to assist. I attended or read the logs of all of the Ubuntu developer week sessions (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuDeveloperWeek) and followed the MOTU resources from the wiki (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MOTU/GettingStarted)

What helped you learn packaging and how Ubuntu teams work?
I like to try and do something myself. It’s typically then when I run into all the problems and deepen my understanding of how things actually work. I started by upgrading some packages (GPA), and then finally packaging something (Google Gears).

What’s your favorite part of working with the MOTU?
I love being able to improve something I use and work with everyday. I enjoy the challenges and learning more about how an operating systems and community fits together technically, but also socially.

Any advice for people wanting to help out MOTU?
Just do it! There is an initial curve when learning the basics, but it gets easier. You don’t need to be a programmer to help, there are great resources and people to assist. Join us on IRC and ask questions! The MOTU mentorship program also is there to help you – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MOTU/Mentoring

Are you involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups?
I am involved with the Ubuntu-ZA loco (http://wiki.ubuntu-za.org/). On the 27th of June 2009 we will be running our PackagingJam (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Jams/Packaging) in Johannesburg!

What are you going to focus on in Karmic?
I am currently working on a way to assist in the syncing of security fixes from Debian to Ubuntu. Furthermore I would like to look at the process on how the merges and syncs are conducted and how this can be improved. I want to get Google Gears into the archive, as well as assist with sponsoring work from contributors.

What do you do in your other spare time?
I focus a fair amount on my real job and social life. I love reading, and learning new things (currently german and python mainly).

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Pedro Fragoso

May 26th, 2009 2 comments

Age: 23
Location: Lisbon/Portugal
IRC Nick: ember

Desk

Desk

Screenshot

Screenshot

How long have you used Linux and what was your first distro?
My first distro was Mandrake, i don’t remember which one, but i remember that i started using Linux when Red Hat 6.0 was released (that was my second distro). I’ve used Red Hat up to 8.0 and then switched to Slackware -> ArchLinux -> Gentoo -> Debian -> Ubuntu. (sort of)

How long have you been using Ubuntu?
I’ve switched to Ubuntu when Gutsy was still in development, i kinda installed Feisty and upgraded to Gutsy.

When did you get involved with the MOTU team and how?
When Gutsy was released i decided to take a shot and get into development to Hardy, i spend my Gutsy journey trying to understand some bits of Ubuntu development. I started to contribute some bits and giving some love to packages of the Desktop Team.

What helped you learn packaging and how Ubuntu teams work?
Mostly by reading the wiki.ubuntu.com and asking on IRC. And with help of some people (like Daniel Holbach and all the Ubuntu Desktop Team)

What’s your favorite part of working with the MOTU?
Be part of making something great like Ubuntu, the community and all the people around Ubuntu development.

Any advice for people wanting to help out MOTU?
Read, start with simple things like triage bugs, and then try something like patches, packing, merges, new upstreams, if you need help spend some time on irc (#ubuntu-motu) and ask.

Are you involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups?
Yes, I’m involved in the Portuguese LoCo.

What are you going to focus on in Karmic?
I’m going to focus on cleaning some bugs and polish some gnome updates, and try to work more with upstream.

What do you do in your other spare time?
Spare time? My spare time is for Ubuntu, the other ‘time’ is for working/studying and sleeping :-)

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Jo Shields (directhex)

May 11th, 2009 5 comments

Age: 25, if Evolution’s calendaring is to be believed.
Location: Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
IRC Nick: directhex

Screenshot

Screenshot

Desk

Not pictured: the 7ft pile of junk that was formed in allowing such a neat desk photo

How long have you used Linux and what was your first distro?
Actively using Linux, I’d say since around 2001. I did a Computer Science degree where the undergraduate laboratories were a 50-50 split between Red Hat and Windows machines. The Red Hat machines were faster, had bigger screens, were always available for use, and (most importantly) had access to a student-run NFS server filled with exciting things like multi-player games.

The first time I actually used Linux generally was when I was at school – probably around the time of Red Hat 5.2. The experience left me swearing off that nonsense for years to come – I was a big fan of BeOS as a non-Windows OS, and at the time, there was really zero comparison between Red Hat and Be in terms of usability. I didn’t install on my own PC again until around 2003-2004, when I installed Debian (or a slight Debian derivative with a kernel actually capable of booting on my system), bouncing around a number of distributions such as MEPIS. I didn’t really use it in anger until the demo for Unreal Tournament 2004 was released, and I discovered the faster load times under Linux gave me a competitive advantage online, leading to the odd situation where for a while I was using Linux for gaming, and Windows for working.

How long have you been using Ubuntu?
I eyed Ubuntu with a degree of suspicion when 4.10 was first released, almost as if it were “cheating” to have a Debian which didn’t require some blood, sweat and tears to get going. I first installed it on an office laptop with 5.10, assuming that getting Debian to be 100% happy on a laptop was probably more trouble than it was worth. I enjoyed the experience enough to begin using Ubuntu as my default distribution, and migrating Debian desktops to Ubuntu over time

When did you get involved with the MOTU team and how?
I began getting formally involved around the middle of the Intrepid cycle – it became clear to me that many packages I was a user of were not being updated much, as the guy who had previously taken charge of merges was busy with other tasks. I decided to pitch in and help, as much as possible, and helped get a few merges arranged to ensure Intrepid would ship with a relatively current set of packages.

This was, however, fairly late in the Intrepid cycle, which left me time to speak with the relevant Debian and Ubuntu people about Jaunty. When it became apparent how much work would be needed to make some exciting changes happen in Debian, which would benefit every Jaunty user, I decided to try and coordinate as much as possible with the greater MOTU population – soliciting as many helpers as I could via IRC and mailing lists. And they delivered – work was completed in Debian (and in Jaunty) in record time, thanks to all of those contributors. Working with them was great fun, so I decided to try it again for Karmic!

What helped you learn packaging and how Ubuntu teams work?
I’ve been running my own unofficial backport repository for a while (long before we had PPAs to make it easy), so I picked up a lot of packaging semantics from keeping those backports in good condition. The basics are fairly easy when all’s said and done – but the devil is in the details, and for the most part, nothing can beat experience in this regard.

Ubuntu teams work in a well-designed (to the casual observer) tiered manner, where it’s usually clear who to speak to at a given moment – and the people I’ve worked with have been pretty indulgent in helping to hurry things along where they’re blocking other work.

One thing I’ve tried to foster since I become involved with Ubuntu is cooperation with Debian – as a result, most of the packages I work on are worked on directly in Debian, alongside other MOTU, Ubuntu contributors, and of course Debian contributors and Developers too. As such, most of my interactions “in Ubuntu” (as opposed to in Debian with Ubuntu people) have been with the sponsors, archive admins, and release teams, and the same simple rule seems to apply for all of those: ask nicely, and do as you’re told.

What’s your favorite part of working with the MOTU?
Definitely the people – and perhaps more specifically, the respectfulness displayed in all directions. Every MOTU is working hard on the same goal – making Ubuntu more awesome. Where people disagree, it’s productive and informative on all sides. Where they agree, it leads to great collaboration and fast turnaround. The last big transition I was involved in was completed in record time, thanks to help from great contributions from MOTU people, who were happy to coordinate in Debian too.

Any advice for people wanting to help out MOTU?
Debian First. By all means, learn everything there is to know in Ubuntu – the people in #ubuntu-motu are often more welcoming, and the barriers to entry in getting your changes included are much lower. But by and large, try to remember Debian: Ubuntu changes benefit Ubuntu and a few others. Changes to Debian benefit everyone, including Ubuntu. This usually means little things like making sure your package builds in Debian Unstable as well as the latest Ubuntu development release (it usually should), and trying to get your packaging to Debian-ready condition from day one (especially the pesky debian/copyright file)

Are you involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups?
I’m subscribed to the local LUG’s mailing list, but haven’t attended anything in meatspace.

What are you going to focus on in Karmic?
I have a big TODO in general, and I expect only some of it will happen in time for Karmic. Primarily, I’ve been trying to do a run on new upstream releases, and on syncability – I want to make sure complaints of “Ubuntu is OLD!” go away, and this means both ensuring the newest versions available are in the archive – and that new versions are pulled in with zero work when they appear in Debian thanks to a lack of Ubuntu deltas.

Tasks which I suspect will be delayed until Lazy Lemur include a focus on including support for new languages, and teaching myself how to package a WebApp.

What do you do in your other spare time?
“Other” spare time, after all the Ubuntu work? Is there such a thing? Videogames, mostly. I have far too many of them, as collected over the last 20 years, and can sink a lot of time into them. I’ve also got some pet chinchillas who need my attention. They’re very fluffy.

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Brandon Holtsclaw (imbrandon)

April 27th, 2009 No comments

Age: 30 ( 12/19/1978 )
Location: Kansas City, Missouri USA
IRC nick: imbrandon

Me and my wife

Me and my wife

My Desktop Area (not pictured, my Intel MacBook Pro Laptop)

My Desktop Area (not pictured, my Intel MacBook Pro Laptop)

How long have you used Linux and what was your first distro?
Not sure about the exact date but I started using linux at my first “Tech Job” around May 1997 on our servers ( our mail, webserver, and radius server ran RH 4.x – yes all on ONE box, scary) that i was responsible for. Not long after that I ran RH and SuSE on my desktops as “Secondary” OS’s for a long time until Breezy came out and all the tech media was a buzz about Ubuntu. I downloaded and gave it a shot and Kubuntu Breezy became my “Main” Desktop OS and I finally rid my computers of MS Windows forever at that point.

How long have you been using Ubuntu?
Since the Beta release of Breezy Badger (Kubuntu 5.10)

When did you get involved with the MOTU team and how?
Very soon after the Release of Breezy I started noticing bit and parts I wanted changed and (k)ubuntu had such inviting developers that it was easy for me to interact with them on IRC and learn the basics of what needed to be done to contribute my patches (mostly gleened from upstream bug trackers), by the end of the Dapper Cycle I was a Seasoned MOTU helping others start just as I did on IRC :)

What helped you learn packaging and how Ubuntu teams work?
Lots of very very friendly MOTU and Core-Developers on IRC from dholbach, jriddell, crimsun, mdz, ajmitch, StevenK, bddebian, azeem, Hobbsee and even Sabdfl himself (and honestly way too many to list here, those are the ones that are outstanding in my mind.) that didn’t mind answering questions and get me going in the right direction not having any prior .deb building or updating experience before coming mostly form a RPM based distro background not debian as most Early MOTU did.

What’s your favorite part of working with the MOTU?
I cant pick just one easily but the top 2 are interaction with a great team of Ubuntu Contributers (it’s no fun if you don’t like whom you have to interact with), and the satisfaction I’m making a difference to many people by getting rid of BUGS!

Any advice for people wanting to help out MOTU?
Don’t be afraid or thing you cant help out, it can be daunting at times but interact and do a little legwork on the Wiki. In no time you’ll be not only learning yourself but helping others just like yourself.

Are you involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups?
We have a local LUG (www.kclug.org) I attend meeting sometimes and often give out Ubuntu CD’s and Help at events the LUG sponsors but I don’t participate as much as I would like, and we only have a State wide LOCO so again I don’t get to participate as much as I would like but do when I can.

What are you going to focus on in Karmic?
I would like to focus on Mono CLI apps and making GTK Apps (like pidgin) play nice in Kubuntu along with help mentor and sponsor new contributors to Ubuntu.

What do you do in your other spare time?
Computer Related I spend a lot of free time doing freelance web development and checking out new podcasts (oh how I miss Jono and Friends on Lugradio) Then when I’m not at the computer I love to go Camping and get out to the lake. I also spend waaayyyy too much time on Guitar Hero and Frets on Fire!!

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Andreas Wenning (a|wen)

March 26th, 2009 1 comment

Age: 23
Location: Currently Bangkok, Thailand
IRC Nick: a|wen

desktop1me_roots_angkor

How long have you used Linux and what was your first distro?
I’ve been using linux since 2006, and my first distro was actually Ubuntu.

How long have you been using Ubuntu?
I actually switched to Ubuntu directly from Windows back when dapper was the new thing. After using it as a second workstation/server for some time, I ended up switching to use Kubuntu edgy as my primary operating system on all I had of hardware. I quickly started developing some interest in how it all worked behind the scene; upgrading to alpha/beta releases and reporting bugs.

When did you get involved with the MOTU team and how?
My more serious involvement started in the beginning of 2007. Ubuntu was changing to apache2 only and all apache1 only modules needed to go away or get updated; I helped investigating possibilities, filing removal reports, sharing my investigations with Debian and taking maintainership in Debian for the modules to be kept, but missing a maintainer. After that I started helping out some more with Kubuntu during the last part of the hardy cycle.

What helped you learn packaging and how Ubuntu teams work?
Trying and trying, reading and reading, and asking lots of question. I’ve had some great sponsors to ask, and both the #kubuntu-devel and #ubuntu-motu IRC channel are great places to hang around if you happen to have a packaging question. And searching around wiki.ubuntu.com has also helped me a lot to get started with new things.

What’s your favorite part of working with the MOTU?
Actually be part of making something as great as Kubuntu and Ubuntu! And the friendly atmosphere of course :)

Any advice for people wanting to help out MOTU?
Find a problem that really annoys you (not too complex you know) and then try to fix it. Reading up on packaging, patching and more on the wiki and joining #ubuntu-motu (or #kubuntu-devel for kde packages) for asking the questions that the wiki doesn’t answer. Fixing rebuildd FTBFS and helping with merges can also give a good hang of the packaging flow.

Are you involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups?
I am, back in Denmark. I hang around the IRC channel, help a bit with answering questions and show up at the release parties.

What are you going to focus on in Jaunty and Jaunty+1?
Trying to get as many of the kde3 packages replaced with kde4 equivalents; and making the kde packages we ship at release rock! Just upgraded to jaunty on my main computer, and they already rock :) but let’s have them rock even more!

What do you do in your other spare time?
Studying for a Master in Telecommunication; that really takes a lot of time. Else enjoying life, doing sports and travelling around Thailand (I’m studying on exchange currently). When I come back to Denmark I will start being a scout leader again…

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Roderick Greening (rgreening)

March 16th, 2009 1 comment

Age: 37
Location: St. John’s, Newfoundland Canada
IRC Nick: rgreening

mugshotmydesktop

My current desktop is running Kubuntu with the Glassified theme. The picture in the background was taken by me 2 years ago, while visiting my parents. It’s a small inlet, called Deep Cove, and it’s in Musgravetown, Newfoundland, my family’s hometown.

How long have you used Linux and what was your first distro?
Well, it all started back in University, and that would have been around ’93. I was working in one of the computer labs, and a friend of mine (TC) said he had this cool new OS that I should try out. He indicated it was very UNIX like, and since we were using UNIX servers for most of our Computer classes, it would be useful.

The distribution was Slackware, and I believe it came on approximately 15-20 floppy disks. I can’t tell you how many hours I spent playing around in that environment. What I can tell you is that it was directly responsible for my current career path, and my first full-time job in the computer industry. I maintained a dual boot system for many years at work, just to run Linux for ‘real’ work and windows for everything else I ‘had’ to.

How long have you been using Ubuntu?
I started using Kubuntu in 2006, though I dabbled with it a little bit earlier than that. Prior to that I was using Gentoo as my main OS, and did so up to about mid 2007.

My main reason for looking into Kubuntu was I had a friend who was quite dissatisfied with Windows. He was constantly having to re-format and re-install his OS to get rid of mal-ware, viruses, and other cruft. I eventually convinced him to test drive Kubuntu along with me. Since then, I have installed Kubuntu for many friends and family members, and they now use Kubuntu as their main OS, and are quite satisfied.

When did you get involved with the MOTU team and how?
One day, while using Kubuntu, my Knetworkmanager stopped working. In order to get back online, I needed to install the Ubuntu nm-applet. I decided then to see if there was something I could do to help troubleshoot it. I jumped onto IRC and joined the #kubuntu-devel channel and started asking some questions.

I was amazed at how helpful everyone was, especially Jonathan Riddell, Scott Kitterman and Harald Sitter. These three devs really got me kick-started, and back into development mode. This was during the tail end of the Intrepid development cycle.

To quote Jonathon from his Kubuntu 8.10 release announcement: “Then there’s rgreening who turned up one day and fixes anything anyone asks him to since”. Since then, I have packaged many releases and updates to KDE4, as well as other KDE Universe packages.

I had really good sponsors, who were patient and helped me out a lot. In particular Scott Kitterman was exceptional. On many occasions he offered up little known (at least by me) tidbits on how to streamline my packaging and testing. WIthout him, I do not think I would have applied for MOTU status.

What helped you learn packaging and how Ubuntu teams work?
It was a combination of reading documentation, asking the right questions via IRC devel channels, working with great sponsors (see above) and looking at other peoples work. Having such a large community is definitely a real benefit to Ubuntu. It is quite easy to find the answer to your question, usually within minutes of looking or asking.

What’s your favorite part of working with the MOTU?
It’s definitely the people. Not only is everyone really knowledgeable, they are also very approachable. Never be afraid to ask a question. It’s how I got to where I am today.

Any advice for people wanting to help out MOTU?

  1. Don’t be concerned whether you have the required skills. If you can install and use Ubuntu, you can help QA packages, submit bug reports and test drive new releases.
  2. Dive right in. The best way to learn is by joining a team you are interested in and helping them, whether it’s testing, writing documentation, etc.
  3. Get a mentor to help guide you, and sponsor your work.
  4. Have fun.

Are you involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups?
There isn’t a LOCO here in Newfoundland, though a couple of us are starting to seriously consider starting one up. I know there is a Linux community here, and it’s been around for a while now, though I believe they mostly use RPM based distros. At any rate, I’m sure I’ll be contacting ‘the Bacon Community’ in the near future, once I get some spare cycles.

What are you going to focus on in Jaunty and Jaunty+1?
Well, right now I have been working on packaging KDE 4.2.1, and will also assist in KDE 4.2.2 packaging. Outside of that, there are improvements to KPackageKit I have implemented, and still some additional things to come.

For Jaunty+1 (Karmic), I have a couple of packages I am developing myself, which I would like to see make it into Universe and/or main. There are two applications, which are security related (ufw-kde and clamav-kde) as well as a new card game written in PyQt.

Additionally, I have been thinking about some work in the server-team, and would like to help them develop a package that would help new admins setup a server with proper TCP wrappers, fire-walling, logging, root-kit checking and log analysis. Currently, these tools exist, but you have to install each one and configure separately. I’d like to bundle a set of these apps (meta package) and help the user configure some sane choices. At this point it’s only an idea, but with UDS looming ahead, who knows where it might lead.

What do you do in your other spare time?
Spare time? Oh, you mean IF I had a personal life outside Ubuntu…

Well, I am an amateur photographer. I have a Canon Rebel XT, and a few lenses. I am mostly interested in scenic/landscape photography, but I also dabble in portraits shots.

I also love to read. I have hundreds of books in my personal library, mostly Sci-Fi and fantasy. I am a real big fan of Star Trek, Star Gate, and Forgotten Realms. My collection also includes a substantial number of technical books on programming and networking.

Outside of that, I spend time with my Wife and dog Jewel, and hang with my friends playing Mario Cart (baby Luigi/quacker) and Settlers of Catan (“monopoly wheat”).

Categories: Uncategorized Tags:

Didier Roche (didrocks)

March 4th, 2009 No comments

Age: 25
Location: Paris/France
IRC Nick: didrocks

Yeah, I am using a default theme with almost no modification. This is because I have to update my free book (licence CC:BY-SA) every 6 months and the screenshots have to be taken with default wallpaper and configuration. Then… well, I’m lazy and default one is sufficient for me :) And my real desktop is… ok, it’s not really a desktop but Wi-Fi ROCKS :p

How long have you used Linux and what was your first distro?
I started using Linux with Red Hat 6 in 1999. I then really become a regular Linux user since Mandrake 7.0 with a KDE based interface. I used Mandrake until 9.0 release of Mandrake, and then decided to try Debian, and was truly satisfied with it, despite the long configuration time it took to have a working environment (at this epoch, this is no more the case now).

How long have you been using Ubuntu?
I was seeking for an easy-to-use and install Linux distribution. I found the “no-name-yet” just a little before the release of October 2004, known as Ubuntu today, and become to take some tests with it and immediately loved it. I have sticked with Ubuntu since and it makes me love the GNOME environment.

When did you get involved with the MOTU team and how?
Last July, during the RMLL (Libre Software Meeting in France), I spoke with Christophe Sauthier (huats) and he told me he was making some packages for Ubuntu. He presented the process and since then, I decided to get into it and start learning how to package.

What helped you learn packaging and how Ubuntu teams work?
Read read (read?) documentation! I never ceased to read documentation, starting from the great resource on Ubuntu wiki and I still do (now that I have finished the “how to secure Debian” and the “Debian reference guide”, I am getting into the “Debian FAQ”, just for fun! Ubuntu, as a derivated distribution of Debian benefits from both distribution huge documentations. I was also part of the mentoring program, and asked a lot and lots of questions to my mentor: Andrea Colangelo, warp10. High five to him! When other/more detailed explanations were needed, just jump to #ubuntu-motu or other Ubuntu channels. Nobody can know everything and that’s where the team is fantastic: you will always find someone who
will be able to help you.

What’s your favorite part of working with the MOTU?
My favorite part is without any contest, interaction with others. You will find great people, a big bunch of helpful and talentuous developers. With such things, you can discover an new thing/concept everyday. How exciting is to see how far GNU/Linux is today!

Any advice for people wanting to help out MOTU?
Do not hesitate to jump in! No programming skills are especially required. Everyone can make Ubuntu better and that’s a great opportunity. You can read https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MOTU/GettingStarted, https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuDeveloperWeek (the first session is available through 5 languages!). Sign for the mentor process if you prefer to have a mentor to guide you through your MOTU journey!

Are you involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups?
Yes! I am involved in French ubuntu-fr loco team as a member of the administration team and part of the chair (as the secretary) of ubuntu-fr French non governmental organization. With this, I am participating to French Ubuntu Party as a core organizer and go to various French FOSS meetings in promoting ubuntu, keeping also some relations with the press. Last event we organized was the Ubuntu Global Bug jam in Toulouse and in Paris and we will participate at 3 events in France this month, one of those is Solutions Linux.

What are you going to focus on in Jaunty and Jaunty+1?
I will still help in GNOME desktop area in the desktop team (please people from other countries come in! It seems to be a French place there!). On a personal project, I will try to dedicate some time to gchildcare, which will be a simple, user-friendly et secure parental children protection software.

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Iulian Udrea (Iulian)

January 12th, 2009 No comments

2009-01-12-184545_1280x800_scrot

Age: 17
Location: Romania
IRC Nick: iulian

How long have you used Linux and what was your first distro?
I have been using GNU/Linux since four years ago. My first distribution was Debian 3.1 Sarge.

How long have you been using Ubuntu?
Since 6.06 Dapper Drake.

When did you get involved with the MOTU team and how?
I got involved with the MOTU team during the Hardy development cycle. I joined the #ubuntu-{motu,devel} channels on Freenode in December 2007, IIRC. After some time of idling and not saying a word in both channels, I started to look at some bugs in Launchpad and tried to fix some of them. My first patch uploaded to Ubuntu was in March 2008.

What helped you learn packaging and how Ubuntu teams work?
I learnt packaging by reading the Debian policy, Packaging Guide from our wiki page and some other excellent documents from the web. Frankly, I cannot remember from where I learnt how Ubuntu teams work. I believe I learnt by reading their wiki pages and talking about them on IRC.

What’s your favorite part of working with the MOTU?
Ouh, that is a very interesting question. My favourite part of working with the MOTU is, obviously the people. I really like how they are interacting with each other and sharing ideas. All I can say is that all of them are really helpful, friendly and it’s just a great feeling working with them. I am really proud that I’m part of this team.

Any advice for people wanting to help out MOTU?
Just dive in. You do not need to know any programming languages by helping out MOTU, but sometimes in may help you when fixing a non-packaging bug. There are many excellent documents from where you can learn packaging. In my opinion, packaging is not so difficult as it looks. It doesn’t take so much time to learn it. Once you learn the basics, it will be piece of cake. You will just need to understand it. Like I said in the previous interview when I wasn’t a MOTU, the hardest step is to get in, once you are in, you will never want to get out, unless you are barmy. :-) Nobody knows everything so do not hesitate to ask questions in the channel or in the mailing list.

Are you involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups?
Unfortunately, I am not involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups.

What are you going to focus on in Jaunty?
I’m going to focus on merging/syncing as many packages as I can and fix nasty bugs. I started to get involved with the Kernel team as well so other than merging and syncing with Debian I focus on making patches for the kernel team.

What do you do in your other spare time?
Reading. I am a fanatic reader, I read a lot, especially Computer and Science Fiction books. I am also a skater. So if I’m not at home, reading, you can find me in the park, skating and jumping like a barmy boy.

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Thierry Carrez (Koon)

January 12th, 2009 3 comments

Thierry Carrez

desktopreal-desktop

Age: 36
Location: In the countryside in the center of France
IRC Nick: Koon

How long have you used Linux and what was your first distro?
My first contact with Linux was in 1994, a Slackware 2.1. Then I installed lots of RedHat (mostly on routers and servers), then in 2003 I switched to Gentoo. It was the first distribution I ran without dual boot on my personal and professional desktop. Gentoo was also the first distro I really contributed to (as manager of their security team).

How long have you been using Ubuntu?
I’ve started using Ubuntu in 2006 (Dapper Drake). At that time I had switched jobs and had my first daughter (less free time to spend hacking computers) so I needed a distribution that “just worked”. I picked Ubuntu and never looked back…

When did you get involved with the MOTU team and how?
In 2008 I was hired by Canonical as a member of the server team. I had to learn Debian packaging (I knew how to extract patches from source packages, but never did one). During the Intrepid cycle, amongst otherthings I packaged in universe a WBEM stack and tomcat6 (which ended up in main). At the beginning of the Jaunty cycle my sponsors got a little tired and pressured me to apply :)

What helped you learn packaging and how Ubuntu teams work?
I started with the Ubuntu Packaging Guide and followed all wiki references. I also participated in the Developer week IRC sessions: something I would recommend to all people interested in development.

What’s your favorite part of working with the MOTU?
It’s difficult to have a growing community that is elite, friendly and open at the same time. The MOTU have managed to create and maintain such a community, and I’m proud to be a part of it.

Any advice for people wanting to help out MOTU?
Get involved, it’s easier than you think. There is nothing magic in maintaining a distribution: once you learn the basics, the sky is your only limit. Join the developer week IRC sessions !

Are you involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups?
I live in the middle of nowhere so there is no local LUG… but I plan to get more involved with the French LoCo.

What are you going to focus on in Jaunty?
I’m investigating solutions for packaging larger Java software into Ubuntu, and I want to push an easy solution to put /etc under revision control.

What do you do in your other spare time?
I’m now the father of two young daughters and that takes most of my other spare time. In my other other spare time, I ride horses and do digital photography.

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Stefan Ebner (sebner)

December 24th, 2008 2 comments

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Age: 18
Location: Hermagor, Austria
IRC Nick: sebner

How long have you used Linux and what was your first distro?
A friend of mine and myself were somehow the “geeks” in our school class and he told me something about suse so we tried suse 9.0. I’m still wondering that I didn’t remove the windows partition on my parents pc accidently but since it was new and strange I deleted it some weeks after I installed it, also because the DSL-modem wasn’t working. Later we tried 9.1 with the same result.

How long have you been using Ubuntu?
I installed Dapper Drake (version 6.06) in august 2006. I sometimes had a windows partition but since the installation ubuntu was my default system.

When did you get involved with the MOTU team and how?
In October 2007 I joined the ubuntu-motu channel on freenode and discovered that Andrea Veri (bluekuja) was not living that far away so I talked a little bit to him and he convinced me to start contributing. After buying a new laptop he started mentoring me from the 1.1.2008 on :)

What helped you learn packaging and how Ubuntu teams work?
The different Packaging guides (Debian/Ubuntu ones). Looking at examples on REVU. Through my work on many merges. Hanging around on IRC tells you a lot about the how the teams work and don’t forget about the wiki pages.

What’s your favorite part of working with the MOTU?
Of course the people. It’s often just great fun to work with them and you can learn a lot talking to them. Besides you have the great feeling to give something back.

Any advice for people wanting to help out MOTU?
Well, as in many interviews already pointed out: Don’t be shy and just ask if you need help. Looking at the wikipages, doing merges and syncs and upload stuff to REVU is a great way to learn how you can contribute to ubuntu.

Are you involved with any local Linux/Ubuntu groups?
In the past I was part of the german ubuntuforum team but stepped back in favour of concentrating to become a MOTU. In the future I’ll help the new Austrian Locoteam and forum to grow.

What are you going to focus on in Jaunty?
I’ll concentrate on C# apps which includes packaging new ones and merges and syncs existing ones from Debian. As I’m MOTU now I’ll also sponsor the work of others besides my own.

What do you do in your other spare time?
Hmm? spare time? what? I’d say nexuiz.

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